Justice Antonin Scalia


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Don Franzen Interviews Justice Scalia on Reading Law

• October 24, 2012 • 11:17 am

The Los Angeles Review of Books features Don Franzen’s extensive interview of Justice Scalia on his new book, Reading Law: The Interpretation of Legal Texts. The interview begins:

FRANZEN: Your Honor, there are already so many treatises written on interpreting text and canons of interpretation, why did you and your co-writer Professor Garner feel that it was time to write this book on “reading law”?

SCALIA: Oh, I don’t think there are that many treatises. I believe that the last treatise that really went through the canons systematically is a hundred years old. The canons have simply been disregarded in recent years. Indeed, they’ve been run down by the academy. So, that’s why we thought it was necessary to teach textualists — those who want to be textualists — how to do textualism. You can’t do it without knowing what are the clues to the meaning of a text.

FRANZEN: I’ve had at least one appellate case that turned on a textual issue — whether or not a particular canon applied. It does seem the treatment of the canons in the cases is sort of haphazard.

SCALIA: They are simply not taught systematically in the law schools, and you’re quite right to the extent that students learn them they learn them episodically — in this case, that case and so forth. And they ought to be taught systematically, I think.

FRANZEN: Should that be a class in law school?

SCALIA: I think there should certainly be a course on statutory interpretation, and more and more law schools have begun to have such courses. But none of them, as far as I know, go systematically through the canons, because there’s no text that has them.

FRANZEN: You and Professor Garner of course are both advocates of “textualism,” the idea that meaning is to be found in the governing text, and also for “originalism,” that you are looking for the “meaning that the text has borne from its inception” — here, I’m quoting from the book. And of course you reject judicial speculation about either what the text means from content outside of the text or the “desirability of the consequences of the reading” — that’s also from your introduction. Text of course governs, but what would you say to the argument that the ability to rely on the original meaning weakens over time? Is there a difference between applying textualism to a contract written in 2008 versus a document written in 1787?

SCALIA: No, it seems to me that the parties agreed to what they agreed to, and I don’t know why it would be fair to give one side or the other a change in the obligations simply because of the passage of time. They said what they said, and they agreed to what they agreed to. I don’t see how the antiquity of the text has any bearing on whether its proper to give it the meaning that the parties that drafted it — if it’s a bilateral contract, or the public that received it, if it’s a statute or an ordinance — understood it to mean.

FRANZEN: Some would be surprised to see that you actually argue against strict construction. In fact, you include strict construction in your list of thirteen fallacies. Most people think textualism, originalism, and strict construction are sort of a trinity.

SCALIA: I think strict construction gives a bad name to textualism. My approach is to give the text a reasonable meaning that it bore when it was adopted. For instance, if you interpret strictly the First Amendment, it would be the case that Congress could censor handwritten letters, because, strictly, it covers only freedom of speech and of the press. A handwritten letter is neither speech nor press. Come on, that’s absurd, that’s not the meaning of the First Amendment. The First Amendment reasonably understood is a guarantee of freedom of expression, whether handwritten or oral, or semaphore or burning a flag.

Justice Scalia Discusses His New Book on Legal Interpretation on C-SPAN

• July 30, 2012 • 3:36 pm

In a C-SPAN video available here, Justice Antonin Scalia discussed his new book, Reading Law: The Interpretation of Legal Texts, co-authored by Bryan Garner. According to the network’s summary, Justice Scalia “defined the meaning of textualism as it relates to interpreting laws and the meanings of the words originalism and strict constructionism as they apply to constitutional law. He cautioned that individuals should read entire judicial opinions before reaching any conclusion about a particular judge’s fairness. In this interview he discussed his opposition to cameras in the Supreme Court chamber. He responded to video clips and talked about criticism from the press, saying that he responds by not commenting or by writing letters to the editor and throwing them away.”

Videos


Justice Scalia Discusses His New Book on Legal Interpretation on C-SPAN

July 30, 2012

In a C-SPAN video available here, Justice Antonin Scalia discussed his new book, Reading Law: The Interpretation of Legal Texts, co-authored by Bryan Garner. According to the network’s summary, Justice Scalia “defined the meaning of textualism as it relates to interpreting laws and the meanings of the words originalism and strict constructionism as they apply to constitutional law. He cautioned that individuals should read entire judicial opinions before reaching any conclusion about a particular judge’s fairness. In this interview he discussed his opposition to cameras in the Supreme Court chamber. He responded to video clips and talked about criticism from the press, saying that he responds by not commenting or by writing letters to the editor and throwing them away.”